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Academic Support

Learning Communities: a small group of students who share common courses, interests, and/or residence.

Transition Programs: unique programs for first year students transitioning from high school to university.

Academic Help: specialized help for math, academic writing, and study skills.

Related Programs

Biology, English

Arts and Science Transition Program

You can begin this program at an
off-campus site through a satellite campus or regional partner.

Enjoy the benefits of a unique university experience that is tailored to your needs and learn in a personalized, supportive environment. The Arts and Science Transition Program offers the opportunity to be a full-time university student to those whose high school grades do not reflect future academic potential. No matter what your educational goals entail, you can get started in the Arts and Science Transition Program.


What is the Arts and Science Transition Program?

This popular initiative has been designed specifically for students under the age of 21 whose high school grades fall below the minimum admission average for the College of Arts and Science. The Transition Program provides a supportive and close-knit learning environment that can help you make the jump from high school to university.

In the Arts and Science Transition Program, you can complete 18 credit units (9 credit units, or three classes, per term) in a Transition Program Learning Community. After successfully completing 18 credit units, you can stay in the College of Arts and Science to work toward a degree or you can apply to transfer to another college or program upon meeting their transfer requirements.

How do I apply?

The Arts and Science Transition Program is open to students under the age of 21 whose high school grades do not represent their academic potential. Transfer students, students with 18 transferable post-secondary credit units or more, are not eligible for the Arts and Science Transition Program.

To apply directly to the Arts and Science Transition Program, follow the same Steps to Apply as other applicants and select "Arts & Science - Arts & Science Transition Program" when prompted to choose a planned program of study in the online application for admission.  

If you think you may qualify for regular admission to the College of Arts and Science or another program, but would like to be considered for the Transition Program if you do not, you may select any other degree option as your planned program of study. Then, make sure to indicate “Yes” when asked if you would like to be considered for the Arts and Science Transition Program if you do not meet the regular admission requirements of your program of choice.

The deadline to apply for admission for all Arts and Science applicants, including applicants to the Transition Program is:

  • May 1: Canadian citizens and landed immigrants/permanent residents
  • April 1: International students

The Arts and Science Transition Program: Is it for you?

“I enjoy the Transition Program because of the smaller class sizes and getting to spend more time with your instructor. ”—Jareme Koska, Redcliff AB

In the Arts and Science Transition Program, you will find people who believe that all students, regardless of their academic performance in high school, can be successful in university, if given the necessary tools.

You will have access to all U of S services and facilities, including libraries, computer labs, math and writing help, Aboriginal student services, disability services, student employment resources, health and counseling services and academic advising, among others.

Transition Program students and students in the Aboriginal Student Achievement Program also enjoy access to a dedicated space for studying and academic advising: the newly renovated Trish Monture Centre for Student Success.

Transition Program Learning Communities

As a student in the Arts and Science Transition Program, you will choose a Transition Program Learning Community based on a set of courses you want to take. A Learning Community (LC) is a small group of first-year students who take classes together and share some common interests. Arts and Science Learning Communities are designed to ease the transition into university by providing our first-year students with extra opportunities to make friends, study and explore ideas together, and work together to develop the academic and personal skills to succeed.

Learning Communities are what a university education is all about. Students and faculty from many different backgrounds come together to explore big ideas and a wide range of perspectives on the world, be creative and grow personally as they advance intellectually, and make lifelong friendships along the way.

In Transition Program Learning Communities, students gather in weekly, hour-long session led by two senior student Peer Mentors who:

  • facilitate sessions on study skills, goal setting and stress management;
  • help students access academic, health, and other support services; and
  • organize information sessions and social events.

Today's Peer Mentors and many campus student leaders started university in a Learning Community, where they developed the friendships, confidence and skills that set them apart.

A Stepping Stone...

“I was a struggling student in high school, and the Arts and Science Transition Program gave me the support I needed to become a successful university student.”—Reanne Risdale, Saskatoon SK

No matter what your future goals entail, the Arts and Science Transition Program can be a stepping stone to help you get there. Develop the skills you need to become a successful university student and find renewed self-confidence as you work toward earning your post-secondary education. Through our unparallelled student support and guidance, our mission is to help you succeed.

Skill Sets Gained

  • Adaptability/flexibility
  • Computer skills
  • Communication skills: written and oral
  • Critical and analytical thinking
  • Problem-solving skills
  • Technical skills

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